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Friday, January 2, 2015

How Evernote Improves Organization In and Out of the Classroom



Over the past few years, Evernote, an educational app designed to
improve organization and collaboration in the classroom has continued to
thrive and grow. Originally it started as an app with the ability to
easily archive notes, Evernote has expanded to ease the jobs of both
teachers and students. Evernote has now given students and teachers
more benefits by adding additional utilities. The best part of all  is
this free app is available to students on all different devices such as:
smart phones, tablets, and laptops for Windows, Mac and Android. While
there is a free version of Evernote, students and teachers may pay a
small amount to gain access to more memory and utilities for education.




When you sign up for Evernote, users have access to really helpful
programs. StudyBlue allows students to easily create flash cards, which
can be used for studying large amounts of information quickly. Also,
RefMe enables students to cite literature easily as well as
bibliographies  and other assignments. Biscuit is another interesting
program that allows students to improve their use of language while
increasing their vocabulary, through word lists and dictionary tools.



One of the most interesting apps of Evernote is called eHighlighter,
which truly improves the organization of students in and out of the
classroom. Students can simply take a photo of their notes or the class
blackboard and upload their photo to eHighlighter.  The app will then
archive the students notes. Essentially, the notes within the photo are
translated into text as if it were typed into a computer. eHighlighter
then enables students to go back and review their notes by running
searches  of specific key words within the notes. This allows students
to easily find and review specific parts of their notes relating to
specific class topics. As these notes are available in a digital media,
students have full access to clearly written notes on their phone,
tablet, or laptop. Furthermore, eHighlighter's features are not limited
to class notes. Students can  take pictures of textbook passages,
figures, graphs, homework assignments, and even confusing math problems
worked out on a blackboard. eHighlighter then organizes all of these
notes and rewrites the notes clearly  to be easily accessible. Another
program in Evernote called Azendoo, allows students to take a photo of
class notes or a worksheet  which is also converted into a digital file.
Then, students can complete the worksheet on any of their devices and
 email the completed document to their teacher. This allows students to
not only easily complete and turn in their homework, but also save a
copy  if there is a problem later on or for review when studying for a
test.



Evernote even has an app that improves the educational experience of
difficult math concepts which can often be awkward to learn on a
computer. Through a program called Scalar, students have access to a
digital notebook which helps map out and store the entire process of
solving lengthy math equations. Scalar even includes a calculator for
crunching numbers and other features where numbers can be color coded or
crossed out to help students visualize solving math problems. Later,
students can return to their account on any tablet, phone, or laptop and
review all of the steps required to solve long and abstract math
equations. Further, they have a copy of the math notes that are clear
and easy to read.



Overall, Evernote has a number of innovative and extremely useful
programs that improve the organization and collaboration of students in
the classroom. In addition to Evernotes programs such as StudyBlue,
RefMe, eHighlighter, Azendoo, and Scalar, have even more programs that
student and teachers can benefit from in and out of the classroom.
Plus, all of the data in a student’s account can be accessed from any
device using the internet  in a clear and easy to read format. Most of
all, Evernote is fantastic because it's technology is available at no
cost and helps more students through the implementation of technology in
education.

The Effectiveness of Online Writing Labs (OWLs)





As the year 2015 quickly approaches, one interesting educational
technology tool to keep an eye is Online Writing Labs or OWLs. These
writing tools are designed to engage high school and college students in
improving their writing skills to fit what college professors are
looking for in essays and reports. More importantly, OWLs focus on
improving writing in general, an important skill to have in all careers,
regardless of the exact field of study in college. Different colleges
such as Purdue University and Excelsior College offer their versions of
OWLs online at no cost to users.



As OWLs are an online based technology, they can be accessed 24/7 from
any laptop, tablet, or other device from any place with an internet
connection.

Within the OWLs offered by Excelsior College, there are 8 different
modules for improving college level writing. There are modules that
focus on the actual process of writing. These processes  help students
think about how they should go about brainstorming, developing
arguments, looking at opposing viewpoints, and more. From there,
students can find modules that help lay the foundations of what to
include in their introductions and main content. In a series of fun to
read and interactive instructional pages, students can also learn how to
write without plagiarizing, control their voice, develop concise yet
effective thesis statements and more. Plus, these pages include tips on
how to revise and edit their papers so students can easily understand
what areas their professors are focusing on during the grading process.
One study showed that, on average, students using OWLs raised their
final grade in a course by 6.6 points. While this is great for
students’ transcripts in the short term, the long term benefit is
improved writing styles which they will inevitably take with them beyond
their educational career.



In addition to OWLs pages of content for improving writing, Excelsior
College’s OWL  includes modules on how to craft writing for different
audiences. There is an essay module and a grammar module which guides
students  on how to write in the type of rhetoric that professors look
for while retaining the proper grammar and format in their college
essays. Another module that is especially useful is the digital writing
module which instructs students on how to write for readers in the 21st
Century. This includes information on writing blogs, discussion
boards, online journals, social media, and more. To help pull all of
these skills together, there is an interactive game called Paper Capers,
which helps students apply what they have learned in the OWL. The game
is designed to teach students how to understand the writing process and
apply their knowledge by answering questions and judging if aspects of
writing, such as different thesis statements and research methods, are
effective.



Overall, regardless of the field of study in college, writing is an
important skill which will follow students for the rest of their lives.
Therefore, OWLs are a great resource for students  as they contain a
wealth of knowledge and interactive media for improving writing skills
and style at no cost. Plus, the programs online format enables them to
be accessible from anywhere with any device at anytime. OWLs will no
doubt go on to improve the quality of education as more students can
utilize technology towards improving their education.

A New and Innovative Education Platform





One of the newest technologies to keep an eye on in 2015 is a creative
education platform called ForClass. Teachers and professors are already
extremely busy and find it increasingly difficult to prepare for class.
ForClass is a platform geared towards easing the difficulties in
preparing for classes while engaging students.



ForClass  enables teachers to assign questions to students for homework.
These questions may be a guided reading, pop quiz, or a list of key
concepts. As students answer these questions, teachers get an
understanding of how each question is answered. This enables teachers
to structure their lecture on the areas were students struggled.
Further, ForClass gives teachers the statistical breakdown of how each
student did on the assignment. Therefore, teachers can see where
individual students are having difficulties and offer them help. This
provides an easier education for each student individually. Over the
course of a semester, ForClass can track a student’s progress, thereby
enabling teachers to determine each student’s reasoning in answering
questions.



One of the most important benefits of ForClass is how simple it is for
the user. Teachers are able to quickly and effortlessly post questions
and assignments for students to complete. The class results of each
question for each individual student show up in real time for the
teacher, in a simple format. Plus, teachers have an archive of all of
their students’ responses at their fingertips. Students have also
described  ForClass as a straightforward platform that encourages them
to become more engaged in class. Students can log on and view each
assignment for each class and answer each question at their own pace.
As ForClass is web-based, any student with a laptop, tablet, or even a
smart phone with a wireless connection can complete their assignments
from almost anywhere.



ForClass also affords the opportunity for teachers to use this
innovative platform in a creative manner. Teachers can use ForClass to
assign take home quizzes or post lecture questions to see which topics
 confuse students. Plus, teachers can come up with their own creative
ways to implement the software in their classrooms that fit their
students needs best.



 Overall, ForClass has additional benefits by being a  low cost or in
some cases a free program for teachers and students. Plus, it is easy
to use for both teachers and students.In addition,  its ability to
enable students to critically think and have fun with class instruction
is a great benefit. Most of all, ForClass keeps students actively
engaged in class material and also benefits teachers by having a clear
understanding of their student’s grasp of the material. It is clear
that ForClass is an excellent addition to any classroom as it is easy to
implement into classrooms where students can utilize technology to
improve the quality of their education.

2014 is a year of reflection

2014 was a year spent reflecting on past achievements in education and their implications for international policy commitments in 2015 and beyond. Our blog remained a popular online hub and the year’s most frequently read posts reflect key topics of discussion and debate emerging during this pivotal historical period:
Quality education
2014-01-29-cover_enThe year began with the launch of the 2014 Report. The report focused on the importance of ensuring quality education for all, a topic of long-standing interest that gained renewed attention in this year’s report. An overview of the report highlights can be found in the blog, “Teaching and Learning: Achieving quality for all”.
The issue of good quality education was further emphasized in our Teacher Tuesday blogging project which told teachers’ stories from across the globe. The teachers talked of running classes during the conflict in Syria, grappling with multilingual classrooms in Honduras, fighting to overcome gender barriers in Afghanistan, teaching in the largest urban slum in Africa, dealing with the pressure of teacher shortages in Malawi and much more. The blogs highlighted the urgent need to increase education resources, hire qualified teachers and provide in-service training opportunities once teachers are in the classroom.

Women and education
Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
In the post, Women’s education helps avert child marriage, the vital role that education plays in reducing child marriage and pregnancy was explored. Education gives girls and women the power to overcome discrimination. They become more aware of their rights and gain greater confidence and freedom to make life changing decisions on their own.
The photo blog: The state of girls’ education around the world highlights the chronic shortage of female teachers and the impact this has on the number of girls that enroll in school and finish their studies. It recommends that the post-2015 education goal include an explicit commitment to equity in education with clear, measureable targets and indicators to track progress.
Youth development
Several blogs in 2014 focused on the need to improve skill development for young people. In Youth is more than the theme of the day; it’s the theme of the decade, we revisited the 2012 report and looked at the need for outcome-oriented targets to ensure effective policy reform.
As part of a series of guest blogs, Abbie Raikes, Programme Specialist at UNESCO, explored the challenges of measuring early childhood development and learning and looked at how the post-2015 “data revolution” can work on behalf of young children.
Credit: Nguyen Thanh Tuan/UNESCO
Credit: Nguyen Thanh Tuan/UNESCO
Mother Tongue Education
Our 2014 report laid out strategies to ensure that children from minority backgrounds acquire strong foundation skills. In the blog, Children need to be taught in their mother language, we looked at how teaching children in an unfamiliar language can actually set them back. A bilingual and sequenced approach that includes mother tongue and the later introduces a second language, improves literacy acquisition and performance in other subjects.
Sustainable development
UNGA_cover
A newly launched booklet, Sustainable development begins with education, looked at education as a catalyst for each of the proposed post-2015 sustainable development goals including: Poverty reduction; nutrition improvement; health and wellbeing; education; gender equality and women’s empowerment; water and energy sustainability; economic growth and decent work; inequality reduction; environmental protection; and peace and just inclusive societies. The booklet emphasized collaboration across sectors as the only way to achieve comprehensible, equitable and lasting development.
Our final most popular post of 2014, Learning today for a sustainable future, highlighted an important point: while access to education is essential, equity and inclusion are also crucial factors for real progress in education. The post also looked at effective non-formal and second-chance learning programmes that provide critical opportunities for young people to return to school and acquire necessary life-skills.
We look forward to continuing to work together to improve education around the world and would like to thank our many readers and contributors. Wishing you all a wonderful New Year!

Children still battling to go to school

Credit: Annie Bodmer-Roy/Save the Children
Sita*, 12 years old, has been living in a makeshift camp for internally displaced people in Sevaré, central Mali, for nine months. She fled her hometown of Gao
when the fighting began in her village and her school was attacked.
A school is supposed to be a safe place for children to learn. It is difficult to imagine that children would be forced to run away from school for fear of attack, much less callously targeted, but this is exactly what happened to Sita, a 12-year-old Malian, and Motasem, a 16-year-old Syrian, whose education was uprooted by fighting. Sita now lives in a makeshift camp for internally displaced people in Sevaré, central Mali, while Motasem is a refugee in Lebanon. They do not know whether they can ever return to school.
To mark the 16th birthday of Malala Yousafzai, who was shot by the Taliban as she was on the way to school in Pakistan in October 2012, we have released a new paper today, ‘Children battling to go to school’, in partnership with Save the Children, to show the extent of the crisis these children are facing. The paper shows that Malala, Sita and Motasem, are not alone: 28.5 million children in conflict-affected zones are unable to go to school. These children now make up 50% of those denied an education, up from 42% in 2008, figures that we calculated for the 2011 EFA Global Monitoring Report, The hidden crisis: Armed conflict and education.
The progress in getting children into school over the past few years – however slow –has clearly not reached children in conflict-affected countries. The longer these children remain out of school, the lower the probability of them ever returning to school.  As conflicts become protracted these children risk becoming a lost generation.
Of the 28.5 million primary school age children out of school in conflict-affected countries, almost half (12.6 million) live in sub-Saharan Africa, 5.3 million live in South and West Asia, and 4 million live in the Arab States. The majority – 95% – live in low and lower middle income countries. Girls, who make up 55% of the total, are the worst affected, as they are often victims of rape and other sexual violence that accompanies armed conflict.
As we analysed in depth in the 2011 EFA Global Monitoring Report, The hidden crisis: Armed conflict and education, countries embroiled in conflict are often overlooked in the international aid structure. The situation has worsened in recent years. In 2012, education accounted for just 1.4% of humanitarian aid, down from 2% in 2009. These funds meet only around a quarter of the amount needed, the largest gap registered for any humanitarian sector, leaving a huge funding deficiency of $221 million.

Education receives a small share of humnanitarian aid

Governments identified conflict as a major barrier towards getting all children into school when they signed the Dakar Framework for Action in 2000. They recognized that children in conflict-affected countries are robbed of an education not only because schools may be closed and teachers absent, but also because they are exposed to widespread abuses. This is confirmed by the visual database of inequalities in education, the World Inequality Database on Education, developed by the EFA Global Monitoring Report, showing how access to education varies hugely depending on whether a child lives in a conflict affected region of a country or not.
The world can no longer continue to sit back and watch Malala, Sita Molasem and millions of other children fight for an education. Classrooms, teachers and pupils will continue to be seen as legitimate targets unless there is tougher action against human rights violations, a reassessment of global humanitarian aid priorities, strengthened rights for displaced people, and a realization that education failures exacerbate conflicts. It is time for action to be taken. The crisis of education in conflict is no longer hidden: there is no excuse for not helping to bring it to an end.

Education for All is affordable – by 2015 and beyond

If governments and donors make concerted efforts to meet the promises they made in 2000, basic education for all could be achieved by 2015, according to analysis in a new policy paper released by the Education for All Global Monitoring Report team.
$26 billion finance gap to achieve basic education
$26 billion finance gap to achieve basic education
The report team estimates that poor countries need an extra $26 billion of external financing per year to achieve good quality basic education with measures to target the marginalized by 2015, up from $16 billion in 2010. I will be going to Dakar next week to attend the Global Meeting on Education after 2015, where proposals for new education goals post-2015 will be discussed, which I expect to include universal lower secondary education. The report team has calculated that such a move would extend the annual finance gap to $38 billion.
With fewer than 1,000 days left until the 2015 deadline of the Education for All goals, the global community needs to make a final push to bridge the financing gap, which is one of the biggest obstacles to education in the world’s poorest countries. It might seem impossible to close the gap of US$26 billion for basic education – by which we mean pre-primary education, primary education and adult literacy. But our analysis shows that by targeting government and donor resources at education, and basic education in particular, the gap can be filled.
Governments in low income countries could raise an additional US$7.5 billion just by spending the recommended 20% of the national budget on education, and allocating 50% of these resources towards basic education.
If donors were to increase the share of their aid that goes to education from 9% to 20% by 2015, and allocate half of this funding to basic education, this would raise a further US$4 billion to help fill the funding gap.
Currently around one-quarter of total direct aid to education never even leaves donor countries. This money is spent on scholarships and imputed student costs for students in developing countries to study in donor countries. Allocating a proportion of these funds to basic education in the poorest countries would contribute US$2.4 billion

These contributions make a combined total of US$14 billion and would go a long way to filling the financing gap, reducing it to US$12 billion.
Governments in poor countries could raise more money by broadening their tax base –for example, by reducing tax avoidance. If they were to increase the share of gross domestic product that is available for government spending, and allocate a share to basic education, this would contribute an additional US$7.3 billion, leaving a remaining financing gap of US$5 billion.
European donors committed to allocating 0.7% of their gross national income (GNI) to aid, but most have not reached this target, and some are far off or even going backwards. If those making this commitment were to keep their promise, it would add US$1.3 billion to the resources available for basic education.
These reforms would collectively reduce the financing gap for basic education in the poorest countries from US$26 billion to just US$3 billion. This remaining gap could easily be filled if, for instance, the United States were to increase its aid commitment to 0.7% of gross national income and target spending at basic education. The gap could also be filled if philanthropic organizations gave as much to basic education as they have given annually to the health sector, on average, over 2005-2010.
If these targets are too ambitious to achieve before the deadline of the existing goals, they should certainly be feasible after 2015.
Extending goals to include lower secondary education would leave a larger gap to fill, but there is no reason why a lack of finance should hold back progress after 2015. To ensure that it does not, the EFA Global Monitoring Report proposes setting a new education goal specifically related to finance:
Our new online hub for resources and other updates on education post-2015
Our online hub for resources and other updates on education post-2015
By 2030, ensure that no country is prevented from achieving education goals by a lack of resources:
1. by maximizing government revenue and ensuring that government spending covers education needs, targeting the marginalized when necessary;
2. by maximizing aid, and targeting it at countries and groups who need it most;
3. by maximizing resources from the private sector, and targeting it at countries and groups who need it most.
If governments and donors, guided by this goal, prioritized basic and lower secondary education after 2015, they could reduce the annual financing gap to US$7.6 billion.
Other sources of education financing, including the group of emerging economies known as the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa), private corporations and foundations, and the proposed International Financial Transaction Tax, also have a larger role to play in funding education in the future.
The global community must renew its promise that no country will be left behind in education due to lack of resources. Further delays will have grave human consequences, especially for the world’s most vulnerable children.

University Admission details, Bangladesh, Seat Plan

University Admission , Application form Collection,
Bangladesh Private, Government university, Public University

University/College Name : Patuakhali Science and Technology University (Business Studies Uni )
Form Collection Date : 01-10-2009 to 01-11-2009
Form Submission Date : 17-12-2008 to 12-11-2009
Admission Test : 21-12-2009

University/College Name : Patuakhali Science and Technology University (Science Unit )
Form Collection Date :01-10-2009 to 01-11-2009
Form Submission Date : 17-12-2008 to 12-11-2009
Admission Test : 21-12-2009

University/College Name : Patuakhali Science and Technology University (CSE Unit )
Form Collection Date :01-10-2009 to 01-11-2009
Form Submission Date : 17-12-2008 to 12-11-2009
Admission Test : 21-12-2009

University/College Name : Rajshahi University of Engineering and Technology (RUET) (Engg Group )
Form Collection Date : 11-10-2009 to 05-11-2009
Form Submission Date : 11-10-2009 to 05-11-2009
Admission Test : 21-11-2009

University/College Name : Textile Engineering College, Chittagong (Engg Group )Form Collection Date : 03-10-2009 to 24-10-2009
Form Submission Date : 16-12-2008 to 27-10-2009
Admission Test : 28-11-2009

University/College Name : University of Chittagong (Kha Unit )
Form Collection Date : 10-09-2009 to 15-10-2009
Form Submission Date : 10-09-2009 to 20-10-2009
Admission Test : 15-11-2009

University/College Name : University of Chittagong (Chha Unit )
Form Collection Date :10-09-2009 to 15-10-2009
Form Submission Date : 10-09-2009 to 20-10-2009
Admission Test : 10-11-2009

University/College Name : University of Chittagong (Gha Unit )
Form Collection Date :10-09-2009 to 15-10-2009
Form Submission Date : 10-09-2009 to 20-10-2009
Admission Test : 12-11-2009


University/College Name : University of Chittagong (Ka Unit )
Form Collection Date : 10-09-2009 to 15-10-2009
Form Submission Date : 10-09-2009 to 20-10-2009
Admission Test : 09-11-2009

University/College Name : University of Chittagong (Cha Unit )
Form Collection Date : 10-09-2009 to 15-10-2009
Form Submission Date : 10-09-2009 to 20-10-2009
Admission Test : 09-11-2009

University/College Name : University of Chittagong (Ga Unit )
Form Collection Date : 10-09-2009 to 15-10-2009
Form Submission Date : 10-09-2009 to 20-10-2009
Admission Test : 08-11-2009

University/College Name : University of Chittagong (Dramatic )
Form Collection Date : 10-10-2009 to 15-10-2009
Form Submission Date : 10-10-2009 to 20-10-2009
Admission Test : 15-11-2009

University/College Name : University of Chittagong (Ja Unit )
Form Collection Date : 10-09-2009 to 15-10-2009
Form Submission Date : 10-09-2009 to 20-10-2009
Admission Test : 10-11-2009

University/College Name : University of Chittagong (Uma Unit )
Form Collection Date : 10-09-2009 to 15-10-2009
Form Submission Date : 10-09-2009 to 20-10-2009
Admission Test : 14-11-2009

Thursday, January 1, 2015

Registration process starts for the 2nd Convocation of BSMMU

The 2nd Convocation of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) will be held in any days between the last week of February 2015 and first week of March 2015.

MD, MS, M.Phil, M.MEd, MTM, MPH and Diploma degree holder candidate who got the result between July 2011 and July 2014 can take part the 2nd Convocation. Candidates who got their results before the mentioned date also take part in the convocation.

Candidates who have already taken their certificates have to submit the certificates at the exam controller office and collect a token, which will be used at the online registration form fill up.

Tk. 5,000/- as the registration fee will be submitted in any online branch of Pubali Bank Limited in favor of the account: 'BSMMU Convocation 2011, CD 3480-4'. Registration form must be filled up before January 31, 2015.
More detail about
Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University Link: www.bsmmu.edu.bd
, M.MEd, MTM, MPH and Diploma degree holder candidate who got the result between July 2011 and July 2014 can take part the 2nd Convocation. Candidates who got their results before the mentioned date also take part in the convocation.

Candidates who have already taken their certificates have to submit the certificates at the exam controller office and collect a token, which will be used at the online registration form fill up.

Tk. 5,000/- as the registration fee will be submitted in any online branch of Pubali Bank Limited in favor of the account: 'BSMMU Convocation 2011, CD 3480-4'. Registration form must be filled up before January 31, 2015.
More detail about
Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University


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